An African model for ethnic reconciliation?

An African model for ethnic reconciliation?With its great diversity of ethnic groups, Africa has long needed models of governance that are inclusive, especially after conflicts driven by ethnic differences. For nearly six months, Ethiopia has shown promise of being such a model. A new prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, has so far achieved a whirlwind of reforms, such as releasing political prisoners and making peace with neighboring Eritrea.

A golden lesson from the 2008 financial crisis

A golden lesson from the 2008 financial crisisTen years ago on Sept. 15, the financial firm Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy, triggering the worst global recession in decades. Largely unnoticed on this 10th anniversary, however, is the fact that it also awakened an improved culture of prudence in many financial firms as well as other companies. While financial crises are hardly new, the job of “risk manager” was invented only about two decades ago.

In Jordan, 'house of safety' offers hope and freedom to at-risk women

In Jordan, 'house of safety' offers hope and freedom to at-risk womenDar Amneh, literally the “house of safety,” is a unique joint project by civil society groups and the Jordanian government to help women at the risk of violence from their own families build new lives. In Jordan, some two dozen women are killed each year in so-called “honor” crimes, when a family member murders a female relative to clear the family name of a perceived stigma, such as pregnancy out of wedlock or purported promiscuity.

For the child victims of priests, what would real justice look like?

For the child victims of priests, what would real justice look like?There are crimes, like the sexual abuse of children, from which many turn away – using language like “unspeakable,” “unimaginable,” or even “inhuman.”  Even survivors create their mental shields from the crimes they endured.  “This form of abuse is really completely and utterly spiritually annihilating,” says Christa Brown, a survivor of abuse at the hands of a Baptist minister decades ago, and an author who now lives in Colorado. “As a survivor, the biggest, most important part of justice is to be heard, and to be believed,” says Michael Norris, a chemical engineer and manager in Houston, who was abused by a Roman Catholic priest while attending summer camp when he was 10.

Putin's war games send signal to West, but Russia-China alliance unlikely

Putin's war games send signal to West, but Russia-China alliance unlikelyThe exercises, kicked off this week by Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping at a summit in Vladivostok, have led some Russian commentators to suggest hopefully – echoed, fearfully, by some in the West – that the two giants might be edging toward a full-blown military alliance. The war games include Chinese troops working with Russians, and a small contingent of Mongolians, in a multi-nation war scenario.

Amid trade fight, Canada returns to its roots in opposition to US

Amid trade fight, Canada returns to its roots in opposition to USAs President Trump threatens the “ruination” of Canada in renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadians are not only surprised, but angered. Old complexes about the Canadian-American relationship, one that has been among the most peaceful in the world for two bordering countries, are resurfacing.

The best way to curb illegal migration

The best way to curb illegal migrationOf all the migrants apprehended along the Southwest border of the United States so far this year, some 43,000 – the largest share – have come from Guatemala. As recent events in Guatemala show, the mass exodus from the Central American country will end only when the people there can elect a government that reflects their values, enabling the kind of trust and integrity that can prevent corruption and violence. In recent years, Guatemala seemed to be heading down that path.

South Sudan's midwives, boosted by aid, wonder how long donors will deliver

South Sudan's midwives, boosted by aid, wonder how long donors will deliverIt was July 9, 2011, and just outside the walls of the maternity ward at the largest public hospital in the city, a country was being born. As Dr. Alice Pityia scrambled through her rounds, the wails of the newest citizens of the world’s newest country mixed with the cheers of the crowd outside. Salva Kiir, offered another, after the man who had been their president for all of 20 minutes.